The Human Face of Poverty

Living in extreme poverty means not having enough to eat, and always worrying about where the next meal will come from; having a house with a dirt floor that does not withstand the elements, and every strong gust of wind or downpour of rain is felt in the house. Poverty often means having no electricity or clean drinking water. Poverty means not having a school nearby to send your children, and even if there is one, deciding whether to send your children to school or have them do something, anything, to earn a few cents. It means not being able to afford the medicines that you urgently need. Poverty all too often means despair!

2014 - Kenoli team talking with people in Las Cruces about their work.
2014 -

This is where Kenoli partners come in. These 25 civil society organizations cannot alter the dramatic effects of climate change, which produces long periods of drought alternating with floods. They cannot compensate for the corruption of their countries’ governments, or the lack of services in the rural areas. Nor can they prevent the terrible violence and lawlessness experienced by the citizens of Honduras, El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua. But what they can do and they do do so well, is make a huge difference in the lives of the poor and most vulnerable people with whom they work.

We are inspired by the work of our partners and the people we meet. They show us resilience and determination in the face of great odds. They have turned despair into hope, empowerment, and a vision for a better future!


Ken Phillips • Chair, Kenoli Foundation

Trustee for Ken & Oli Johnstone Foundation

dona